TimManBlog

Whatever I'm Thinking

Archive for the tag “County Courthouses”

Dayton, Washington, and the Fields of the Palouse

June 29, 2022
(Photos and memories from June 18, 2009)

It’s a glorious day in Dayton, Washington.  A few wisps of cirrus clouds accent the bright blue sky.  On the horizon, I see the white of high clouds above the blue sky, which meets the spring green of Palouse hillsides.  The canola fields of The Palouse are spectacular.

Canola fields of the Palouse above the town of Dayton, Washington

The small town of Dayton (population 2,500) lies in a valley below hillsides of grain; some are striped with brown fallow portions.

Downtown Dayton, Washington, below the Palouse’s striped fields of wheat.

Dayton lies at the southern edge of The Palouse, a spectacular grassland region of southeastern Washington and northwestern Idaho. The town wasn’t named for Dayton, Ohio, as you might suspect, but for early settlers Jesse and Elizabeth Day, who came here in the 1870s. The population here is about 2,500 persons.

There’s only one commercial street in Dayton.  The Liberty Theatre is at one end; Disney’s “Up” arrives in town in two weeks.  A few coffee shops surround that, but there’s plenty of activity here.

Main Street Dayton, Washington

Down the street, an Eagle’s aerie dominates the main business block.  A nostalgic mural is painted on the front wall and provides a reminiscence of life in 19th Century Dayton.

Here are a few more photos of Dayton: if your thing is boutique hotels, then try The Weinhard Hotel; the old-fashioned reliability of Elk Drug provides both prescriptions and a soda fountain; enjoy the look of a beautiful old Victorian home; and the Dayton train depot is the oldest in Washington state, dating from 1881. Dayton’s business district has been designated a National Historic District.

Across the street from the Liberty Theatre on Main Street, the Columbia County courthouse is a gem of gingerbread.  It’s gray wood with stone trim.  The square dome is three stories above a fine green lawn that was being mowed as I took photos.  The front and back entrances have statues of Lady Justice above them; the east and west entrances have golden eagle statues. It’s been in use since 1887.

The Columbia County courthouse has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The 1887 Columbia County courthouse, Dayton, Washington.

More photos of the courthouse, including the interior stairwell, a closeup of the statue of Lady Justice on the roof, and a historical plaque explaining Dayton’s history.

Lewis and Clark rafted down the Snake River in 1805 during their voyage to the Pacific Ocean. For their return trip in 1806, they traveled overland, passing through present-day Dayton along an old Indian trail that connected Celilo Falls on the Columbia River with the Nez Perce lands of the Palouse. A town mural memorializes their journey.

Mural showing the travels of Lewis and Clark through Columbia County, Washington.

On the hillsides outside of town are seemingly endless fields of canola flowers.  The yellows against the sky and the distant Blue Mountains were spectacular.

Columbia County within the state of Washington.

A list of all photo posts from the American County Seats series in TimManBlog can be found here.

All photos were taken by the author on June 18, 2009.

I’m trying to travel to all of America’s county courthouses, and each month a post about my visit to the most interesting county seats. It’s a hobby, and donations are greatly appreciated to help defer my costs.
Thanks,
Tim

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00

Or enter a custom amount

$

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

List of all Photo Posts in the American County Seats series in TimManBlog

List of photo posts from the American County Seats series in TimManBlog (last updated February 28, 2022):

ALABAMA:
Mobile’s Mardi Gras

ARIZONA:
Kingman Arizona — Caravans of Cars and Camels

ARKANSAS:
Salem, Arkansas: Clean Livin’ and the Spitball

CALIFORNIA:
Climbing to Mariposa

The Languor of Santa Barbara

COLORADO:
Doc Holliday and the Spa of the Rockies in Glenwood Springs, Colorado

FLORIDA:
Key West, Florida (Monroe County)

GEORGIA:
The Courthouse and Town of Greenville, Georgia

IDAHO:
Emmett, Idaho: Gem of Plenty

ILLINOIS:
Dixon, Illinois: Three Presidents

INDIANA:
Vincennes: The Town that Made Indiana American

IOWA:
The Little Norse Town of Decorah, Iowa

It’s a Wonderful Life in Denison, Iowa

KANSAS:
Mennonite Pastries Banned in Cimmaron, Kansas

KENTUCKY:
Paducah, Kentucky’s Murals and Townscapes

LOUISIANA:
St. Martinville: Louisiana’s Acadian Capital

MASSACHUSETTS:
April 19th in Middlesex County, Massachusetts

MICHIGAN:
Manistique — The Battle for Michigan
Marquette, Michigan: Experience the Warmth!

MINNESOTA:
Summertime in Waseca, Minnesota

MISSOURI:
Civil War Scenes in Hartville, Missouri

MONTANA:
Butte, Montana: The Richest Hill on Earth
Fort Benton, Montana: Head of Navigation on the Missouri

NEBRASKA:
Emigrants’ Return: California Refugees in Plattsmouth, Nebraska

NEVADA:
The Lonely Road Through Eureka, Nevada

NEW MEXICO:
Los Alamos:  A City on a Hill
Truth or Consequences — and Quixotic Occupy Wall Street

Taos
For ‘Days Gone By’ in New Mexico (Reserve, NM)

NEW YORK:
The Entire State is New York and Albany is its Capital

NORTH CAROLINA:
The Town of Sylva in Western Carolina

NORTH DAKOTA:
The Grand Courthouse in Rugby, North Dakota

OHIO:
Neil Armstrong’s Hometown (Wapakoneta, Ohio)

OKLAHOMA:
Adventure and Victory: Frederick, Oklahoma

OREGON:
Enterprise, The Jewel of Eastern Oregon

PENNSYLVANIA:
Small Town Prosperity in Warren, Pennsylvania

SOUTH CAROLINA:
∙ February in Walterboro, South Carolina

SOUTH DAKOTA:
∙ Keep Calm and Look Far (Bison, SD)

∙ Along the Pathways of Exploration: Fort Pierre, South Dakota

TENNESSEE:
∙ Long Distance Information, Give me Memphis, Tennessee

TEXAS:
A Big and Notable Place — Lubbock, Texas
Christmastime in Johnson City, Texas
January Calmness in West Texas (Marfa, Texas)
Sit and Enjoy the Yesterdays, Today, and the Tomorrows (Coldspring, Texas)
Jerry Baker’s Silverton, Texas
Georgetown, Texas — Town Square and Spring Wildflowers

UTAH:
∙ A Statue of Liberty in Heber City, Utah

WASHINGTON:
Stevenson, Washington in the Columbia River Gorge
Dayton, Washington, and the Fields of The Palouse

WISCONSIN:
January in Baraboo, Wisconsin

WYOMING:
Sheridan, Wyoming: Retirees Home on the Range


I travel as a hobby and not for a living (yet) — but donations are happily accepted if you’d like to help defer my costs.
Thanks,
The TimMan

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00

Or enter a custom amount

$

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Climbing to Mariposa

March 31, 2019

The Scenic Route to Mariposa

If someone were ever to write the Great California Epic, they might wisely choose Mariposa as the central setting, for Mariposa, near the entrance to the great Yosemite Valley, is the navel of the Golden State. All California life seems to flow from this place like water from a spring.

Mariposa is nestled in the foothills of California’s central Sierra Nevada Mountains, just outside the boundaries of Yosemite National Park.

Mariposa County in the state of California

To get here, start from the San Joaquin Valley raisin towns of Fresno or Madera on a clear March morning (as I did, back in March 2016). Then, put away the road map and turn on Google Maps. Change the settings to “avoid highways” and follow the roads uphill. Here’s what your climb will look like:

Climbing above the San Joaquin Valley (Madera County, California)
Country road, Madera County
Isolated ranch hours, Madera County

Entering Mariposa County:

Old Farm house, Mariposa County
Oak Trees, ranches, and Sierra spring run-off

The climb gets steeper as you get higher into the Sierra, but the grass is still as green as if it were Ireland.

Sierra Nevada foothills, Mariposa County, California
Spring freshet, Mariposa County

The road twists around granite boulders as you climb higher into the mountains.

Mariposa County

Finally, you arrive.

Downtown Mariposa, California along the “Central Yosemite Highway”

I remember coming up to Mariposa for the first time back in the 90s with my then-girlfriend. She pointed out that Mariposa means “butterfly” in Spanish. She knew of what she spoke.

Mariposa, California

Mariposa is an old gold mining town and the seat of Mariposa County. The old courthouse was built in 1854, was the scene of some landmark mining cases, and is still in use today. It’s the oldest county courthouse in the state of California. It may be even older than the two Sequoia trees which guard the front entrance.

Mariposa County Courthouse.
Mariposa County Courthouse

The courthouse has only one courtroom. Portraits of Lincoln and Jefferson are the only adornment on the wall behind the Judge’s seat, which is odd considering that judges, lawyers, and juries were meeting here before Abraham Lincoln was even elected President. I’m told that the old stove still provides primary heating for the courtroom.

Main courtroom, Mariposa County Courthouse

Mariposa County was once huge, covering most of central California but has since been carved into many other counties. Its namesake butterflies are actually only found in the San Joaquin Valley below the mountains, now part of other counties.

Want to stay in town? The 5th Street Inn looks nice.

5th Street Inn, Mariposa, California
Christian Science Church, Mariposa

Here’s where the locals eat — the Pizza Factory. It was busy when I was there. Good food, spacious seating. Here policemen, firemen, and other local residents enjoy a respite from seasonal tourists.

(Mariposa) Pizza Factory

Just to remind you that you’re still in America, there’s this:

9-11 Memorial, Mariposa, California

All photos were taken by the author. Photos were taken in March 2016.


A list of all photo posts from the American County Seats series in TimManBlog can be found here.

I’m trying to travel to all of America’s county courthouses, and each month a post about my visit to the most interesting county seats. It’s only a hobby — but donations are greatly appreciated to help defer my costs.
Thanks,
Tim

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00

Or enter a custom amount

$

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Kingman, Arizona — Caravans of Cars and Camels

February 24, 2019

Even though January has turned into February, it remains the year 2019 and so my 2019 New Years’ “Goals”, or Resolutions, still apply. One post per month I resolved — I wrote down the goal on paper and even worse, I posted my intentions on Facebook. Now that promise is forever on the internet, and there can be no excuses. So herewith is the February 2019 installment featuring an old friend — warm, sunny Kingman, Arizona.

Welcome to Kingman, Arizona

I’d seen Kingman several times before. Kingman is a crossroads.  Looking eastward from Los Angeles (where I lived during the 1980s) Kingman is the gateway to the rest of the country. I drove through Kingman to get to the Grand Canyon, Amarillo, Kentucky, and to my parent’s home back in Pittsburgh. If you’re traveling north and south instead of east and west, the long desert highway that is US 93 intersects the I-40 in Kingman, about halfway between Las Vegas and Phoenix. 

At first, I saw the town as a hot, dusty Arizona truck stop, but I wasn’t the first caravan to come through.

Lieutenant Edward Fitzgerald Beale, commanding a caravan of camels, blazed a wagon route through Northern Arizona Territory back in 1857-58. Beale Street in Kingman is named for him. (But apparently not Beale Street in Memphis. Wikipedia has Beale’s resume.)

Beale is remembered here:

Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale, 1822-1893. Pioneer in the Path of Empire. Hero of the War with Mexico. Lieutenant in the United States Navy. Appointed General by the Governor of California. Commanded exploration of wagon route to the Colorado River with the only camel train in American history, 1857-1858.

Beale’s wagon route soon became a railroad route. Mining sprang up in Kingman and then receded. As cars followed trains, Route 66 followed the railroad route, then Interstate 40 replaced US 66. Even with the mines gone, Kingman is forever a crossroads and will never disappear.

An old Santa Fe locomotive in town park

Unless you get off the Interstate you won’t notice the snow-covered rocky cliffs above the historic buildings along old Route 66. Kingman has a few nostalgic hotels here, some old bars, and so forth.  The Beale Street Brews coffee house brings life to this street, along with the Red Neck Pit BBQ next door (now Floyd and Company Real Pit BBQ). Here are a few buildings and street scenes:

Snow-speckled mountains above old Route 66 in Kingman
The old Kingman Club (I wonder if Jack Kerouac drank here?)
The old Brunswick Hotel (now “Hotel Brunswick Suites”) Route 66, Kingman

A few blocks off Beale Street the Mohave County Courthouse stands like a Roman temple above the forum.  Built in 1914 of local gray stone, it emerges behind a line of tall, thick juniper trees.  The trees are three stories high; the courthouse is only two, but the cupola adds maybe another story and a half.  The building stands at the top of Fourth Street, looking down on Kingman from above – a good place from which to administer Justice. 

Mohave County Superior Court, Kingman, Arizona

As the courthouse was built in 1914, the front statue was likely added a few years afterward, following the end of World War I. This particular design — a doughboy holding a hand grenade aloft in his right hand — is a common design for World War I memorials seen throughout the country.

World War I Memorial

Finally, some more examples of old stone construction:

Mohave County Health Department (old building, scenic view)
St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, Kingman

I hope you enjoyed Kingman and are enjoying your February. March is just around the corner…

Mohave County in the state of Arizona

All photos by the author. Photos were taken in February 2010, except for the courthouse photos which are from October 2005.

A list of all photo posts from the American County Seats series in TimManBlog can be found here.

I’m trying to travel to all of America’s county courthouses, and each month a post about my visit to the most interesting county seats. It’s only a hobby — but donations are greatly appreciated to help defer my costs.
Thanks,
Tim

One-Time
Monthly
Yearly

Make a one-time donation

Make a monthly donation

Make a yearly donation

Choose an amount

$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00
$5.00
$15.00
$100.00

Or enter a custom amount

$

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

Your contribution is appreciated.

DonateDonate monthlyDonate yearly

Post Navigation